Seed Saving Part 1

Gathering seeds from the home garden in the dry or the wet state. http://www.greengardenservice.net.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

19 Responses to “Seed Saving Part 1”

  1. That depends on the types of seeds you are trying to save. If it is vegetables try Seed to Seed (Second Edition) by Suzanne Ashworth . You can buy it from Seed Savers Exchange online catalog. It’s also on Amazon. If it’s tree and shrub seeds try locating the old out of print Wood’s Tree Seed Manual. Forestry departments across the planet have pdf publications on trees for free on the web.

  2. what book or books do u recommend concerning saving seeds?

  3. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 1:31 pm

    Life is a long strange trip. Yes, back in the 1960 through the 70s I grew grains and processed them. Later I decided that corn was the perfect grain for use in low tech settings.  This went on for years until I moved to suburban California and ran out of room for such things. My wife, who was the baker in the house filed for divorce and all my interest in bread left with her. Today I raise 80% of my nuts, about 90% of my fruit and around 70% of my vegies.

  4. arboristBlairGlenn Reply May 31, 2013 at 2:20 pm

    Bill, do you grow the wheat and process it for bread?

  5. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 2:27 pm

    The same screens do double duty for drying produce. Check out the video called “Sun Dried Tomatoes” on my sight and you will see the same screens.

  6. Thanks for the screen on screen way of drying seeds. I can try that this year. :)

  7. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 4:02 pm

    Dave’s not home but he taught me how to save seeds.

  8. You sound a little like Chong. “Dave?”

    Thanks for the info!

  9. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 5:34 pm

    Thank you for taking the time to watch this video. If you messed up it is just the path to greater understanding. Don’t stress. The seed you picked may still be good depending on how green it was when you picked. With radishes be sure to leave the best in the patch for seed, not the ones that bolt. It is idea that the pods have turned brown but haven’t split yet. Radish will shatter and sow their seed if you wait too long. Tie a paper bag over the stalk to catch the seed as it falls.

  10. I am new to saving seed and by the looks of your awesome video I messed up with my radish plants! I let a few go to seed and picked the plump green pods from the plant to let them dry instead of letting them dry on the plant. UGH! I wish I watched this first!!! Are they all garbage or can I still let them dry and get seed??

  11. catfish222banjo Reply May 31, 2013 at 6:33 pm

    also thanks for seed knowledge and more guitar!

  12. catfish222banjo Reply May 31, 2013 at 6:58 pm

    welp. the face on the tree is potentially the greatest thing ever!

  13. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 7:31 pm

    The corn is left on the stalk until the stalks are nearly dry. Stalks should be brown and crunchy with the husk dry and papery before removing ears. The husk is pulled back and the ears hung in a ventilated space for further drying. The kernels should be hard to the thumb nail and the cob dry before shelling. Shelling is done either by hand or with a steel corn sheller. It is best to leave the corn seed dry on paper for a week or two before storage.

  14. uh… why did it double post my question? … anyway… my corn ears are dry, but I can’t tell how dry they need to be for me to knock em off, can you explain best as you can please?

    Thanks. I appreciate your help very much.

  15. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 8:16 pm

    I can do that but it will have to wait until corn is ripe and the ears have dried in the fall.

  16. A video would be great for others to learn.

  17. GreenGardenGuy1 Reply May 31, 2013 at 8:29 pm

    Corn is the easiest. Allow it to dry hard on the cob then knock it off the cob with a sheller or by hand. Winnow the chaff in a breeze and store for future use.

  18. Hello,

    Can you show us how to save corn seed?

    Thanks

  19. Awesome information! Thank you for posting :)